The Costliest Concrete Construction Projects Ever Built

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All over the world, concrete is one of the most popular building materials to use. While in the United States, most homes feature wood frames, globally concrete is significantly more common. Why is that? It’s durable, flexible, and affordable.

With that said, sometimes concrete construction projects can get a little pricey, especially when they are large in scale or combined with other materials. How costly are we talking? Well, the most expensive project on our list comes in at $459 billion.

While we wouldn’t want you to expect your concrete projects to break the bank, it is fun to see just what this material can do. So, without further ado, let’s take a look at some of the costliest concrete construction projects ever built.

The Israeli Barrier Wall—5 Billion and Counting

Due to the conflict in the region, Israel began constructing a barrier wall back in 2000. At the time, it was fairly small and hastily constructed. Over the years, the initial parts of the wall have been torn down and rebuilt, and the wall extended to cover other parts of the country’s border as deemed fit. The first section of the wall was 450 miles and since then a second section of 150 miles was built. While this project began in 2000, it is still in progress, which means that its cost will only continue to increase.

The Channel Tunnel—22.4 Billion

As you would imagine, any construction project that takes place under water is going to cost a lot of money. The Channel Tunnel—also known as the Chunnel—runs below water to connect England and France, covering a total distance of 31 miles. The project was unprecedented at the time, and massive in scale. In all, it took fifteen different companies to see the project through and 6 years to complete it. While the construction costs were 22.4 billion, the Chunnel also costs a significant amount to secure and maintain on a day-to-day basis.

The Big Dig—23.1 Billion

US highways and interstates are expensive to construct and expensive to maintain—as we will discuss a bit later. As such, it stands to reason that changing them in any way is also going to cost a pretty penny. The Big Dig is a project that aimed to massively overhaul the highway system in and around Boston, rerouting major roads and taking the biggest artery of the system—Route I-93—underneath the city itself.

As you can imagine, tunneling underneath one of the oldest cities in the country is bound to cause some trouble, but The Big Dig was plagued by much more than the planning team ever expected. From preserving architecture to examining and excavating archeological finds, The Big Dig was completed millions of dollars above budget and nearly 10 years behind schedule.

Kansai International Airport—29 Billion

Anytime you create your own island, costs are going to run high. And that is precisely what was made for the construction of Kansai International Airport. Situated in Osaka Bay, the island itself is heavily constructed with materials designed to withstand earthquakes and tidal waves. The airport structure is also large and has been expanded several times since its initial completion. As the island is prone to sinking, supports must be added every so many years, which has significantly added to its original 29-billion-dollar price point.

The US Interstate System—459 Billion and Counting

Unlike most other projects on this list, there is no initial completion date for the US interstate system. As such, it continues to increase in cost every year. The system began in 1956 with the goal to ease civilian transportation while also making it easier to mobilize the military should the US come under attack. Every year, new routes are added based on the changing needs of citizens and businesses, which means that as of now, there is no end in sight.

Your Concrete Construction Project Doesn’t Need to Break the Bank

When you work with Accu-cut, you get the best results at the best price. When we get to work, we do so with your bottom line in mind. If you have a project you are considering, call us to receive a free estimate.